It Will End Like This by Kyra Leigh – Review

For fans of The Cheerleaders and Sadie comes a psychological thriller that reminds us that in real life, endings are rarely as neat as happily ever after. A contemporay take on the Lizzie Borden story that explores how grief can cut deep.

Charlotte lost her mother six months ago, and still no one will tell her exactly what happened the day she mysteriously died. They say her heart stopped, but Charlotte knows deep down that there’s more to the story. 

The only person who gets it is Charlotte’s sister, Maddi. Maddi agrees—people’s hearts don’t just stop. There are too many questions left unanswered for the girls to move on.

But their father is moving on. With their mother’s personal assistant. And both girls are sure that she’s determined to take everything that’s theirs away for herself.

Now the only way to get their lives back is for Charlotte and Maddi to decide how this story ends, themselves.

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Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC of this unrelenting take on the Lizzie Borden mystery. I was totally expecting it to be a closer tie to the infamous story, a la ‘See What I Have Done’ or ‘Miss Lizzie’, but I was pleasantly surprised with what turned out to be an exploration into what may have been Lizzie Borden’s mindset at the time of the crime, as well as the open-ended whodunnit that has stumped investigators and interested parties for decades. These focuses created a narrative that was so addictive that I absolutely could not put it down. I’ve had a hard time reading this year– but I think It Will End Like This has reignited my passion.

We begin the journey into madness by meeting Charlotte and her sister, Maddi. Their mother recently died, but even before that, the family had been falling apart. The stress of a miscarriage caused the household to fall into grief, but none more than the matron of the house. The girls were told that her heart had just stopped– but neither one believed it. Charlotte fell into a deep depression after her mother’s death, and she quit therapy, school, and herself. It caused a sort of split in her mind; one that Maddi tried to glue together. When she was finally able to pull her back out into the real world, the two began to find clues that led them to believe their mom may have not died from natural causes at all. They suspected murder.

It is in this vein that this twisted and heartbreaking view into a broken home continues. There is no one to trust; not the sisters’ friends, not their dad, and definitely not their mom’s personal assistant who has now taken up her role in the household. Paranoia runs rampant, and the stress wears down on both Charlotte and Maddie. The mental exhaustion manifests differently in both, and we get an honest look on how tragedy alters life. And at its climax, we are left wondering what truly happened to the matriarch– and also who penned the grisly end of this tale. I was impressed with the amount of raw emotion poured onto these pages, and how easily I was sucked into the dark mystique. This is well worth the read, not only for any follower of Lizzie’s story, but also for those searching for an honest look at just how messy human lives (and deaths) can be.

5/5 stars